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South African law: Legal History

Truth and Reconciliation Commission

"The Truth and Reconciliation Commission was not a court as such but a different kind of forum set up to deal with political crimes committed during apartheid. The Amnesty Committee had the power to grant amnesty (which means the perpetrator cannot be prosecuted) for politically motivated crimes fully and truthfully confessed, under certain conditions. The Human Rights Violation Committee decided on acts which constituted violations of human rights, based on statements made to the TRC. Once victims of gross human rights violations are identified, they were referred to the Reparation and Rehabilitation Committee, which decides on how to compensate victims. The work of the TRC is almost complete. Those who were not granted amnesty by the TRC for crimes committed during apartheid can be prosecuted."

Copies of the book Judging the judges, judging ourselves : truth, reconciliation and the apartheid legal order by David Dyzenhaus are available in the Social Science Library (next door) at KTL1610.A9.DYZ and KTL1613.DYZ, or in Rhodes House Library.

Texts on topic

 To find other works on this topic, try these subject searches in SOLO.

Judicial process -- South Africa -- History

Law -- South Africa -- Philosophy ;

Political questions and judicial power -- South Africa ;

Apartheid -- South Africa ;

Law -- Political aspects